Kids these days : human capital and the making of millennials / Malcolm Harris (B. 1988)
Book | Little, Brown and Company | 2017 | First Edition.
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Published
New York, NY : Little, Brown and Company, 2017.
©2017
Description
ix, 261 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages [233]-248) and index.
Summary
"A Millennial's groundbreaking investigation into why his generation is economically worse off than their parents, creating a radical and devastating portrait of what it means to be young in America. Millennials have been called lazy, entitled, narcissistic, and immature, but when you push aside the stereotypes, what actually unites this generation? The short answer: They've been had. Millennials are the hardest working and most educated generation in American history. They have poured unprecedented amounts of time and money into preparing themselves for the twenty-first-century workforce. Yet they are poorer, more medicated, more precariously employed, and have less of a social safety net than their parents or grandparents. Kids These Days asks why, and answers with a radical, brilliant, data-driven analysis of the economic and cultural forces that have shaped Millennial lives. Examining broad trends like runaway student debt, the rise of the intern, mass incarceration, social media, and more, Harris shows us a generation conditioned from birth to treat their lives and their efforts-their very selves and futures-as human capital to be invested. But what happens when children raised as investments grow up? Why are young people paying such a high price to train themselves for a system that exploits them? How can Millennials change or transcend what's been made of them? Gripping, mercilessly argued, deeply informed, and moving fluidly between critical theory, political policy, and pop culture, Kids These Days will wake you up, make you angry, and change how you see your place in the world. This is essential reading--not only for Millennials, but for anyone ready to take a hard look at how we got here and where we're headed if we don't change course fast"-- Provided by publisher.
"Millennials have been stereotyped as lazy, entitled, narcissistic, and developmentally delayed. In fact, they are the hardest working and most educated generation in American history, a generation that poured unprecedented amounts of time and money into preparing themselves for the 21st century market. Yet here they are: poorer, more medicated, more precariously employed, and with less of a social safety net than their parents or even their grandparents. To find out why, Malcolm Harris, himself a Millennial, decided to conduct a meticulous, data driven analysis of the cultural, technological, and (especially) economic forces over the past 40 years that have shaped Millennial lives. What he discovered, and the sense he made of it, will change how you see yourself, your country, and our future - whether you're a Millennial or not. Examining broad trends like the professionalization of childhood, runaway student debt, the rise of the intern, mass incarceration, social media, and more, Kids These Days charts the rise of an American ethos so normalized that we forget to notice it: the treatment of children as investments, and he dares us to confront the consequences when those children grow up. Gripping, mercilessly argued, and deeply informed, Kids These Days is essential reading, not only for Millennials but for anyone ready to take a hard look at how we got here and where we're headed if we don't change course fast"-- Provided by publisher.
LC SUBJECT
Keyword
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Social Classes.
HISTORY / United States / 21st Century.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economic History.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Labor.
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Social Classes.
HISTORY / United States / 21st Century.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economic History.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Labor.
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Social Classes & Economic Disparity.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economic Conditions.
Contents
Danny Dunn and the homework machine. The pedagogical mask ; Kid-shaped capital ; Risky child-rearing ; Helicopter parents, vigilante moms, and zero tolerance ; Xtremely sad teens ; I guess this is growing up -- Go to college. The average student ; Anyone can afford a brand-new diploma ; Why is college so expensive? ; Failing reform school ; When is a default not a default? ; The student debt time machine -- Work (sucks). The changing character of work ; Getting paid ; Polarization ; The feminization of labor ; Precarity ; Nice work if you can get it ; Deunionization ; Just get an intern ; Owners and profiteers -- The Feds. Not-so-entitled Millenials ; The juvenilization of poverty ; Left behind in the race to the top ; Cops ; Pens ; Murderers -- Everybody is a star. Post-Soviet training ; Trophies and moneyball ; Big workers on campus ; Toddlers in tiaras ; The birth of tweens ; YouTube and fruity loops -- Behavior modification. Bad brains ; Pills ; Social media ; Good habits ; Porn -- Conclusion. Seven signs of the bad future ; 1. Huan capital contracts ; 2. Professionalization of childhood ; 3. Climate privilege ; 4. Discrimination by algorithm ; 5. The malfunctioning ; 6. Misogynist backlash ; 7. Fully tracked ; Bop It solutions. Buy it! ; Vote it! ; Give it! ; Protest it! ; Put it down! -- Final word.
ISBN
9780316510868 hardcover
0316510866 hardcover
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